How an Audio Driver Works: Simply Explained

Are the words hyper text mark-up language and World Wide Web already triggering a headache? Some people are not really that computer-savvy and smart when it comes to details regarding drivers, software, and hardware, especially those who belong to the earlier generations. But being a non-computer graduate doesn’t mean that one must be totally computer illiterate. Gaining knowledge about how the computer works, even just the basic ones, can save one the effort and money of giving the computer technician a call every time there is a problem.

Ever wondered how it works? Then today is the right time to know. Here’s a simple guide on how an audio driver works, explained in a very simple way, so that those who are not that familiar can still catch up with the world.

An audio driver is a kind of driver for sound devices. A driver is software or a program that enables the computer to communicate with its hardware or other external devices. It is somewhat a medium for a certain device to work.

It is just like in the human body, before the body can execute any action it must first be at the command of the brain. For example: if a person wants to jump, the brain must first send signals to the specific organ for jumping (leg muscles and skeletons) through the spinal cord that it wants to jump. Now, the spinal cord serves as the medium for the brain and the legs to communicate. When the leg receives the command from the brain through the spinal cord, it will then do the action. A driver works as easy as that.

It works by letting the sound card/audio card, a computer expansion card that serves as the facilitator of audio inputs and outputs to and from the computer, to communicate well with the speakers. If the audio driver is incompatible with the sound card or is outdated, then it’s more likely that the speakers will not function properly or it would create low quality sounds. Now that’s how an audio driver works. Simple, isn’t it?

That is why going for it is really a great investment. However, with the unending flow of driver downloads swarming the Internet, the chance that one would end up downloading the correct and the best audio driver is so slim. But don’t fret yet – because there is a solution to this problem.

One of the best and the easiest ways to find the best audio driver is to have the best driver software database program. In the plainest definition, a driver software database program is a program that will help a person find the most updated and compatible audio driver for his or her device. And yes, this will come a little handy because if one has installed the wrong driver, a device will not work properly. Finding a reliable website or program that will find one the best audio driver is indeed, heaven sent.

Lastly, installing a good audio driver is not enough. Getting it updated is equally important, too. Manufacturers update their drivers usually once a month, so don’t forget to check for driver updates from time to time.

Should I Quit Weed Cold-Turkey Or Cut Down Gradually?

A common question people often ask when they first quit weed, is “Should I quit weed cold turkey or cut down slowly?”

Look at it this way; the two contrasting options when quitting weed are obvious:

  • Stop smoking weed cold turkey
  • Stop smoking weed slowly or cut down gradually

Each has advantages, however one of them is clearly the right way to go about quitting weed. Let’s look at both strategies to determine which one will cause you the least discomfort in your efforts to quit.

Quitting Weed Cold Turkey

To stop smoking weed cold turkey means that one day you simply stop, and never look back. The plan is to never smoke again and people are satisfied to take on all withdrawals at once, knowing that it is only going to be once.

Like they say: Do it one time, and do it properly.

It is very easy to plan to quit cold turkey, although you need to make a plan for the onset of withdrawals and decreased stress tolerance. You may not be the nicest person in this time.

  • PROS: Less planning
  • CONS: More stressful (if you don’t know what you are doing!)

Quitting Marijuana Gradually

To slowly cut back is the opposite. You hope to experience more bearable withdrawals for a longer time, this way the hurdle of quitting altogether seems lowered and you have more chance of success in the long run – that’s the thinking behind it anyway.

  • PROS: More planning and discipline
  • CONS: Less stressful, although it may not work

Which Method Works For Often For More People?

Although different people employ different strategies to cope with marijuana addiction, the fact is that one of these ways works far more often than the other – on almost every person.

Believe it or not, when it comes to stopping a marijuana addiction, cold turkey is the answer.

Cold turkey is definite. There is not a lot to contemplate after you have passed your ‘quitting date’.

Quitting gradually may seem easier at the beginning (obviously – you haven’t even quit yet) but many people fail in the long run when they try this tactic. It’s almost a trap!

Don’t cigarette smokers cut back slowly to help them quit?

Yes they do, although it would be wise of you not compare a marijuana addiction to a nicotine addiction. Chemicals in nicotine are purely physical addictions, fueling a physical need in the consumer.

Marijuana’s strength and cravings lie mainly in the psychological addictions it creates in users. This will keep you coming back to weed, and this is what you will need to deal with primarily in order to quit. Do yourself a good deed, quit weed cold turkey.

IT Job Titles – What Do They Mean?

Although only a few decades old, the information technology or IT field is as broad and deep as industries that have been around for centuries. IT job categories, titles and specialties abound – so many that anyone investigating IT as a career is likely to be very, very confused. What’s the difference between a Network Engineer and a Network Support Analyst? Between a Web Developer, a Web Designer and a Web Technology Specialist? Just what does a Database Administrator do?

Although labels and responsibilities tend to vary from employer to employer, here are some common IT job titles and their descriptions. Consider these when looking for an IT career that best suits your interests, talents and temperament:

Database Administrator – A database is any collection of information that a company or organization keeps on file (e.g. customer names, addresses, inventory, etc.) The Database Administrator (DBA) is in charge of organizing, maintaining and updating this database and creating systems so that people authorized to view, add or remove information are able to do so as quickly and as easily as possible.

Internet Solutions Developer - This is a “catch-all” description for a person responsible for devising and executing Internet-based projects. The job usually involves working with programs that allow the public to view and interact with a company, organization or agency’s Website.

IT Project Program Manager – This is a managerial position requiring some years of experience in the IT field. The IT Project Program Manager is responsible for finding solutions to IT-related problems and then implementing those solutions, often with the help of a team.

Network Administrator – A “network” is any collection of computers that are linked either to each other or to a central server so that information can be created, shared and updated. The Network Administrator is generally responsible for making sure than an existing network runs smoothly and for adding or removing hardware (computers, printers, etc.) and software (programs, applications) from the system.

Network and Security Specialist – The Network and Internet Security Specialist is the person responsible for making sure people who use a computer network only get access to that information they are allowed to see, that information in the network database’s is protected and properly preserved, and that the network cannot be accessed (or “hacked”) by unauthorized individuals, wherever they may be.

Network Engineer – The network engineer is usually responsible for 1) Designing new computer networks, 2) Actually creating these networks, 3) Installing the computers and software that connect to the networks and, 4) Ensuring the network is able to grow and function as needed.

Network Support Analyst – A Network Support Analyst is much like a Network Administrator in that he/she is responsible for keeping an existing network operating as needed, but has fewer managerial responsibilities. The Network Support Analyst may also be responsible for monitoring how people actually use the network, identifying problem areas and then recommending and implementing solutions.

Software Developer/Engineer – “Software” is the set of instructions that make a computer do what you want it to do. The Software Developer/Engineer is the person who writes the instructions, also known as “code,” for these computer programs/applications. Software Developer/Engineers may work “in-house” developing customized programs for a specific employer or client, or may work on programs that are then sold commercially.

Technical Support Specialist – Computers and networks invariably have problems, and it’s the Technical Support Specialist’s job to identify these problems and find a way to correct them. Technical Support Specialists often work at “help desks” where they communicate with company employees or customers by phone, IM or email.

Web Developer – Web Developers create, maintain and update the functional aspects of Websites, be they on the Internet or on a company’s internal Intranet. When designing a new site, they’re usually responsible for creating its architecture, navigation and interactive functions. They may also be responsible for creating programs or applications designed specifically for the Web.

Web Designer – While the Web Developer is concerned with the technical aspects of a Website or Web-based application, the Web Designer is responsible for how such a site or application actually looks. This is an artistic position that requires training and experience in graphic design and layout – and perhaps even animation — as well as the technical aspects of Web operations.

Web Technology Specialist – This position combines the responsibilities of the Web Developer and Web Designer. The Web Technology Specialist needs to not only the technical aspects of Websites and applications, but also needs to frequently handle the design and graphic aspects as well.

If you are considering career training in Information Technology, you need to understand these (and other) job descriptions so you can pursue the education and training that will qualify you for the kind of IT job that fits your talent and personality.

What Is The Difference Between a Mobile Enhanced and a Mobile Friendly Website?

Back in February 2015 when Google first announced that their now famous ranking algorithm “mobilegeddon” would be rolled out on in April that same year there was a crazy scramble by website owners to bring code up to date and make sure their websites functioned correctly on multiple devices including mobile phones and tablets so as to avoid any Google penalties.

Now around 18 months on we look at how web design and development has transformed because of the increased smart phone and tablet use and what you should to expect from your mobile compliant website.

Responsive web design (RWD) is now industry standard and there should be no need to ask your designer whether your website will be mobile/tablet friendly or not and whilst there may still be a handle of unscrupulous amateur design agencies adding on extra money for the ‘privilege’ of having a responsive site most genuine designers simply see it as the way websites are designed nowadays.

There is however a very big difference between mobile friendly and mobile enhanced just like there is a big difference between having just a website and having a website that is search optimised and user friendly.

Many agencies will simply throw content into a responsive framework just to pass Google’s mobile friendly test and keep the client happy. I’ll be honest, I’ve seen some truly terrible so-called mobile friendly websites in the past 18 months, every one able to pass Google’s mobile friendly test yet doing little to enhanced a mobile users experience or bring in new business for the website owner.

A lot of the problem is with the high number of unskilled web design agencies using outdated frag and drop site building software or third party templates and simply not having the required coding skills to re-arrange and enhance the content for mobile users.

What works and looks good on a desktop will not necessarily work well and look good on a mobile phone due to the size and orientation of the screen. A good designer will view your new site on various devices and take into account your niche or type of business and will use the site as if they are a client or customer.

Do you want a client or customer to be able to call you simply by clicking a button? Then a clickable ‘call now’ button should be visible without scrolling as should your logo, business name and navigation menu. Is your text readable on a mobile? Having different font sizes and spacing on a mobile gives a much neater site and better user experience. Simple adjustments for the mobile phone user can make a big difference.